A research project to ascertain the methods of promotion used to reach newly qualified and student doctors throughout the U.K.

Date of publication: June 1, 1973

Author(s): D. G. Andrew

Abstract:

The following paper describes a piece of qualitative Pharmaceutical Marketing Research, the need for which was created by the apparent lack of success on the part of the Client Company in promoting to younger and more junior doctors. Background information was inconclusive in either proving or disproving this suspision and, to a certain extent therefore, the motivation for the research was intuitive. A face-to-face extended interview technique was selected within the research design suggested by the Agency in order to overcome various problems, not least of which was the cost of conducting such a survey using one of the routine quantitative approaches. The findings of this study suggests that film meetings are the most effective way of communicating with student and newly-qualified doctors. Teaching hospitals should not be regarded as places where normal representative activity will be effective amongst very young doctors. Teaching aids are a medium of promotion to student and newly-qualified doctors which offer a high level of acceptability and memorability. First year General Practitioners are more receptive, at this critical stage of their career, to all information and experiences with drugs and this activity could form habits that could last a lifetime.

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